May Flowers, 2019

Just for pretty, in no particular order, the ‘pile presents a pile o’ posies.

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Rhododendron bud. The father of the man who helped me plant this bush was the designer of the original “bear” plastic squeeze bottle honey container.  

 

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Perennial “bachelor button”. Centaurea montana. 

 

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Water bejeweled siberian iris. I bought ten different siberian iris by mailorder, some 45 years ago, for ten dollars, and I can’t get rid of them. What a tenacious plant. 

 

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Columbine. Every year or two a seed rack lures me into buying another package of columbine seeds. I start them in a flat, and at some point, plop them in here and there. I like columbine. A little red and yellow columbine was one of the first flowers I ever fell in love with, at age two or three. 

 

 

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Post-rain, a pooped poppy plopped on a rock. Talk about ephemeral…one day this flower’s a bud, the next it’s at the peak of perfection, and seemingly the next it’s nothing but a pile of petals.

 

 

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One of the last of this season’s tulips.

 

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Siberian iris, another one, poses in front of a granite boulder. 

 

 

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Lemon lily. One of the earliest hemerocallis. Smells nice.

 

 

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Foxglove. Digitalis. It’s getting naturalized on the place, and is starting to pop up in unexpected locations. 

 

 

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A dark purple bearded iris. 

 

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The dark purple bearded iris. 

 

 

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Rhododendron bud, bursting open. What beautiful form. 

 

 

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Rhododendron. 

 

 

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Amsonia, which some call “Blue Milkweed”. We’ve been planting milkweed family around here, to encourage monarch butterflies. In a good sign for this years monarchs, a friend has already seen some. And they were laying eggs. May there be many monarchs this year! Want to make more milkweeds? Here’s a link. https://blog.nwf.org/2015/02/twelve-native-milkweeds-for-monarchs/

 

 

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Tree peony. Slow to grow. Beautiful to behold. 

 

 

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Doronicum, or “leopards’ bane”. This composite is new to me. I found some plants at roadside, and have dug a few of the rhizomes to grow “up”. Nice to have a super-early daisy. 

 

 

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Rosa rugosa. An invasive, but a well-mannered one. Such a smell! 

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3 responses to “May Flowers, 2019

  1. Lovely! My brother-in-law has been planting milkweed around his property for years to attract the Monarchs. It’s amazing to watch the larvae devour the plants before they spin their cocoons.

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