San José: From Corrugated Steel to Street Art.

You’ll find corrugated steel throughout Costa Rica.

If you fly in to the country, one of the first things you’ll notice are roofs.

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From the air on the approach to the San José airport. A dense settlement of houses with corrugated steel roofs. New roofs. Painted roofs. Rusty roofs.

Galvanized corrugated steel is something you will see every day.

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From the approach to SJO airport. Long steel-roofed buildings, probably for livestock of some kind. Which kind? No idea.

After you land, you see corrugated steel from lesser heights.

In the next photo, we are looking east from the second floor of the Casa Ridgway Quaker guest house.

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In the foreground is the corrugated steel roof of Casa Ridgway. The fancy modern layer cake in the background is the Tribunales de Justicia building.

We often stay at Case Ridgway when in San José.

The last photo looked east.

This next looks west.

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Looking west from the second floor. Rust is the finish coat on this once-shiny steel.

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Another western view from another second floor window, this window is in the Posada Trianon, a few blocks from Casa Ridgway.

When steel panels are taken off roofs, they often end up on walls.

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Sun is strong in Costa Rica. Colors are not fast under light’s onslaught.

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A cascade of steel angles down to a street-level fence.

Morning shadows cross rippled steel.

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Once steel panels reach street level, they’re fair game for graffitists.

Street artists transform sheet steel into social statements.

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I think this was on Avenida 3. These panels extend for hundreds of feet. You don’t have to go to a museum to see them, either. For more, see: https://thetompostpile.wordpress.com/2014/03/24/a-glimpse-of-san-jose-street-art/

There are more good steel photographs in the archives, but they’re not yet moved onto the new computer.

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2 responses to “San José: From Corrugated Steel to Street Art.

  1. There is not much in the way of layers of insulation under most of these roofs. We were in the Osa last year, under one of these roofs, when a rainstorm came through. It was LOUD.

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