February Amaryllis

Sunshine came strongly through the window today.

And lit up the amaryllis on the old dining room table.

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We have had this blushing bloomer for twelve or fifteen years.

The original single bulb is now three.

 

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And each one of the bulbs has thrown a flower stem.

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The two buds that have opened have four blossoms each.

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We’ve had snow on the ground for weeks.

Tonight the temperature is supposed to sink to fifteen Fahrenheit.

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Having flowers such as these, in February, cheers a person.

 

 

 

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5 responses to “February Amaryllis

  1. Amaryllis: Once they’re done blooming, we set them out of the way in the house, in as bright a location as possible. We keep them watered and fertilized (osmocote time-relase fertilizer will work, so will liquid plant fertilizer, or compost tea) until the weather is warm. Then we take the plants outside, to a partly sunny spot, along with most of the other house plants. We water and fertilize occasionally. There they stay until fall. When the frost time gets near again, we bring the plants in, and stop all water, to give the plants a dormant period. The leaves will die after a while. After a couple of months of no water, we start to water again, the bulbs return to growth, and we get another year of blooms. We find that some plants are slower to wake up than others. Another way to maintain your amarylli in good condition it to annually replace the top inch of soil in the pot. Amaryllis doesn’t like to have its roots disturbed, so this is a good way to keep their dirt in good shape. The bulbs will occasionally split or send out offshoots. These will increase in size each year, and bloom eventually. They don’t seem to mind being crowded, so we repot only if they stop blooming or if they break the pot.

  2. Thanks, Tom! Today was not the first time I’ve returned for a reminder of your method in keeping the bulbs potted during their period of dormancy. Here’s to another hopeful season.

  3. And here I am again, having returned for another confirmation check about caring for amaryllis bulbs through the dormant period.

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